1952 half dollar value
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1952 Franklin Half Dollar Value

The Franklin Half Dollar, named after founding father Benjamin Franklin, was a silver half dollar series minted in the United States from 1948 to 1963. The 1952 Franklin Half Dollar, in particular, is a coin that holds great historical and numismatic significance. Its intricate designs, composition, and various errors make it a must-have for coin collectors and history enthusiasts alike. In this article, we will explore the value, history, features, and errors of the 1952 Franklin Half Dollar, along with some helpful tips on how to identify and appraise this iconic coin.

1952 Franklin Half Dollar obverse
Obverse
1952 Franklin Half Dollar reverse
Reverse

Coin Specification

  • Type:  Franklin Half Dollar
  • Country: United States
  • Year: 1952
  • Face Value: 50 cents
  • Silver Weight: .36169 oz
  • Metal Composition: 90% Silver – 10% Copper

History and Features of the 1952 Franklin Half Dollar

The Franklin Half Dollar was introduced in 1948 and was minted in 1963. It was designed by John R. Sinnock and featured Benjamin Franklin on the obverse and the Liberty Bell on the reverse.

The Obverse and Reverse Designs of the 1952 Franklin Half Dollar

The obverse of the 1952 Franklin Half Dollar features a left-facing portrait of Benjamin Franklin, the Founding Father who was also a famous author, printer, and inventor. The word “Liberty” appears above his head, and the phrase “In God We Trust” appears to the right. The reverse of the coin features an image of the Liberty Bell with the phrase “United States of America” above and “Half Dollar” below.

Other Notable Features of the 1952 Franklin Half Dollar

The 1952 Franklin Half Dollar is made of 90% silver and 10% copper, and it weighs 12.5 grams with a diameter of 30.6 mm. The coin was struck at three different mints: Philadelphia, Denver, and San Francisco. The mint mark, indicating where the coin was produced, is located on the reverse, just above the Liberty Bell.

The Importance of Mint Marks and Productions for 1952 Franklin Half Dollar Value

Understanding 1952 Franklin Half Dollar Mint Marks

The mint mark on a coin is a tiny letter or symbol that identifies where the coin was made. For the 1952 Franklin Half Dollar, there are three mint marks to look out for: “D” for Denver, “S” for San Francisco, and no mint mark for Philadelphia. The mint mark can be found on the reverse side of the coin, above the small eagle.

The mint mark on a 1952 Franklin Half Dollar can greatly affect its value. Coins from the San Francisco mint, for example, are often worth more than those from Denver or Philadelphia. This is because fewer coins were produced at the San Francisco mint, making them rarer and more valuable to collectors.

Production Figures for the 1952 Franklin Half Dollar

The production figures for the 1952 Franklin Half Dollar can also impact its value. In 1952, over 21 million Franklin Half Dollars were produced at the Philadelphia mint. Over 25 million were produced at the Denver mint, and just under 5 million were produced at the San Francisco mint.

Coins from the Philadelphia mint are the most common and are typically worth less than coins from the Denver or San Francisco mint. However, coins with low mintages, such as those from San Francisco, are often worth more, even in lower grades. In general, the fewer coins produced, the more valuable they are to collectors.

1952 Franklin Half Dollar Value Guides

If you have a 1952 Franklin half dollar with no mint mark and it’s in good condition, its value is typically around $9 to $12.5. However, if the coin is in excellent condition or is a particularly rare variety, its value could be much higher.

1952 P Franklin Half Dollar Value

If you have a 1952 P Franklin half-dollar in good condition, its value is typically around $9.5 to $12.5. However, if the coin is in excellent condition or is a particularly rare variety, its value could be much higher. For instance, a 1952 P Franklin half dollar that has been graded as MS-67 (mint state, meaning it is in excellent condition and has not been circulated) by a professional coin grading service could be worth around $1,500.

1952 S Franklin Half Dollar Value

If you have a 1952 S Franklin half dollar in good condition, its value is typically around $9.5 to $12.5. However, if the coin is in excellent condition or is a particularly rare variety, its value could be much higher. For instance, a 1952 S Franklin half dollar that has been graded as MS-66 (mint state, meaning it is in excellent condition and has not been circulated) by a professional coin grading service could be worth around $1,330 to $1,800.

1952 D Franklin Half Dollar Value

If you have a 1952 D Franklin half dollar in good condition, its value is typically around $9 to $12.5. However, if the coin is in excellent condition or is a particularly rare variety, its value could be much higher. For instance, a 1952 D Franklin half dollar that has been graded as MS-66 (mint state, meaning it is in excellent condition and has not been circulated) by a professional coin grading service could be worth around $760.

1952 Franklin Half Dollar Errors

The 1952 Franklin half dollar series, like any other coin series, has some imperfections and variations, but they are not necessarily rare. One of the most well-known of these variations is the Full Bell Lines (FBL). Half dollars with the Liberty Bell featuring complete horizontal lines are a relatively rare variation, with a cost of about 50% more than those from the regular strike. However, some of these coins are even more valuable. For example, a 1952 FBL half-dollar minted in Philadelphia won a record $42,300 at an auction in 2019.

The Bugs Bunny error is another common variation for the Franklin half-dollar set, but it is not as significant as those produced three years later. However, having one could earn you some money. This error type is a result of the obverse and reverse dies clashing without a piece of metal in between, making the atypical design parts transfer possible. In this particular case, a part of the eagle’s wings struck next to Franklin’s upper lip, resembling a bunny tooth.

Here are the values of the 1952 FBL Franklin half-dollar according to their condition and mint mark:

ConditionNo Mint Mark 1952 FBL half-dollar1952 D FBL half-dollar1952 S FBL half-dollar
MS 64$35 to $42$40 to $48$600 to $700
MS 65$110 to $132$125 to $150$900 to $1,500
MS 66$350 to $402.50$450 to $556.60$1,500 to $2,250
MS 67$1,500 to $2,000$9,000 to $11,000$9,000 to $10,500

*Values from Greysheet

Can I still use a 1952 Franklin half dollar as currency?

The 1952 Franklin half dollar is no longer a legal tender, which means it cannot be used as currency to make purchases. However, it can still be collected and traded as a numismatic item.

Are there any rare varieties of 1952 Franklin half dollars?

There are a few rare varieties of 1952 Franklin half dollars that are highly sought after by collectors. One such variety is the 1952 Franklin half dollar with a doubled die obverse, which is caused by a misalignment in the coin die during production and results in the obverse design appearing doubled. Another rare variety is the 1952 Franklin half dollar with a proof finish, which is a special finish applied to coins intended for collectors rather than circulation. These coins are struck using a different process than circulation coins and have a highly polished finish. Both of these varieties are much rarer and more valuable than standard 1952 Franklin half dollars.

How much is a Franklin silver half dollar worth from 1952?

The value of a Franklin half dollar from 1952 can vary depending on its condition, mint mark, and any errors or varieties it may have. In general, a 1952 Franklin half dollar in good condition is worth about $9 to $12.5, but if it is in excellent condition or is a particularly rare variety, it could be worth up to $1500.

Where is the mint mark on a 1952 Franklin Half Dollar?

The mint mark on a 1952 Franklin half dollar can be found on the reverse of the coin, above the bell and to the right of the eagle. If there is no mint mark, it was minted in Philadelphia.

Are all Franklin half dollars 90% silver?

Yes, all Franklin half dollars minted from 1948 to 1963 are composed of 90% silver and 10% copper, except for the few rare 1955 “buggy” coins which were mistakenly minted on dime planchets (smaller than the half dollar planchet), which are worth a significant premium.

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