1964 Kennedy Half Dollar value
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1964 Half Dollar Value Guide

Are you curious about the value of a 1964 Kennedy Half Dollar? This iconic coin is a collector’s favorite and has a fascinating history. Not only is it a piece of Americana, but it also has a special place in the hearts of coin collectors worldwide. Whether you’re a seasoned collector or just starting, understanding the value and history of this coin is essential. In this article, we’ll explore the 1964 Kennedy Half Dollar’s history, features, and rare errors, as well as provide a comprehensive guide to its value. So, if you’re looking to learn more about this beloved coin and why it’s one of the valuable Kennedy half dollars, keep reading!

1964 Kennedy Half Dollar
1964 Kennedy Half Dollar reverse

Coin Specification

  • Type: Kennedy Half Dollars
  • Country: United States
  • Year: 1964
  • Face Value: 0.50 USD
  • Silver Weight: .147893 oz.
  • Metal Composition: 90% Silver – 10% Copper

History and Features of the 1964 Kennedy Half Dollar

The 1964 Kennedy half dollar was minted to honor the memory of President John F. Kennedy, who was assassinated on November 22, 1963. The U.S. Mint wanted to issue the coin for circulation by January 1965, and it took less than a month to design and mint the new commemorative coin.

The Obverse of the 1964 Kennedy Half Dollar

The obverse of the 1964 Kennedy half dollar was designed by Gilroy Roberts, the chief engraver of the U.S. Mint. He used Kennedy’s Presidential Medal to design the portrait of the President on the obverse of the coin. However, after the first designs were struck, Jackie and Robert Kennedy suggested some changes to the hair on the portrait, resulting in two circulation varieties of the coin.

The Reverse of the 1964 Kennedy Half Dollar

The reverse of the 1964 Kennedy half dollar was designed by Frank Gasparro, the assistant engraver of the U.S. Mint. He used the Seal of the President of the United States to design the image of a heraldic eagle on the reverse of the coin.

Other Features

Other notable features of the 1964 Kennedy Half Dollar include its composition and weight. The coin is made of 90% silver and 10% copper, which makes it highly valuable to collectors. It weighs 12.5 grams and has a diameter of 30.6 millimeters, which is slightly larger than the previous half-dollar coins.

The U.S. Mint produced 273,304,004 coins dated 1964 and 156,205,446 dated 1964-D from the Denver mint. However, with the rise in silver prices, the Mint stopped producing 90% half dollar coins by 1965, changing the alloy to 40% silver and later to 75% copper and 25% Nickel.

Mint Marks and Productions of the 1964 Kennedy Half Dollar

Mint Marks

The 1964 Kennedy half dollar was produced in two mints: the Philadelphia Mint and the Denver Mint. Coins minted in Philadelphia carry no mint mark, while coins minted in Denver have a “D” mint mark located on the reverse side of the coin, just above the half dollar denomination.

Production

The United States Mint produced 273,304,004 1964 Kennedy half dollars at the Philadelphia Mint and 156,205,446 at the Denver Mint. The coins were made of 90% silver and 10% copper, and were issued for circulation on March 24, 1964.

Due to the popularity of the coin, collectors and speculators around the world hoarded as many coins as they could get their hands on, and very few actually had the chance to become worn. In an attempt to prevent the hoarding of the 1964 silver coins, Congress authorized the freezing of the date until further notice.

The Philadelphia Mint coined another 144,182,000 1964 Kennedy half dollars in 1965, and a final 41,674,000 in 1966. The Denver Mint coined 114,411,608 1964-dated half dollars during 1965 and another 41,793,838 in 1966. However, most of these coins were also hoarded and few remained in circulation for more than a month or two.

Gems of the 1964 Kennedy half dollar are fairly available in grades as high as MS-66, but many of these require attractive toning to push them past the MS-64 level. Prooflike (PL) coins are known but are quite rare. Some doubled-die obverse (DDO) and doubled-die reverse (DDR) varieties are also known.

1964 Kennedy Half Dollar Value Guides

When it comes to determining the value of a 1964 Kennedy Half Dollar, several factors come into play. As of 2023, a circulated 1964 Kennedy Half Dollar can fetch between $11 and $11.50, while an uncirculated one can sell for as much as $5200 in pristine condition.

1964 No Mint Kennedy Half Dollar Value

The 1964 Kennedy Half Dollar with no mint mark can also be referred to as the Philadelphia Mint variety. It is the most common of the 1964 Kennedy Half Dollars, and a proof 60 coin is worth $10, while a proof 67 coin is valued at $42. The highest value for this variety is a proof 70 coin, which can fetch as much as $3,750.

1964 D Mint Kennedy Half Dollar Value

The 1964 D Mint Kennedy Half Dollar is rarer than the Philadelphia Mint variety and is highly sought after by collectors. An uncirculated 1964 D Half Dollar can sell for as much as $23500.

1964 Silver Kennedy Half Dollar Value

All 1964 Kennedy Half Dollars are made of 90% silver and 10% copper, giving them intrinsic value. The silver content alone is worth around $6.50 as of March 2023, regardless of the coin’s condition.

1964 Proof Kennedy Half Dollar Value

Proof coins are struck with special dies and polished multiple times to create a mirrored finish. The non-cameo types of 1964 Proof Kennedy Half Dollars are valued at $10 for proof 60, $42 for proof 67, and $3,750 for proof 70 coins. Cameo varieties are valued at $14 for proof 60, $60 for PF66, and up to $350 for PF69. The deep cameo variety has an even higher value, with PF66 fetching $100, PF67 valued at $200, and up to $3,000 for PF69.

1964 SMS Kennedy Half Dollar Value

The 1964 SMS Kennedy Half Dollar is a special variety that was only produced for the annual coin sets issued by the US Mint. The most valuable SMS Kennedy Half Dollar is graded SP68, which can fetch up to $156,000.

1964 Kennedy Half Dollar Value Chart

Type of 1964 Kennedy Half DollarValue Range (as of March 2023)
No Mint$11 to $11.50 (in circulated condition)
1964-D MintUp to $23,500 (in pristine, uncirculated condition)
Proof$10 (for Proof 60) to $3,750 (for Proof 70) for non-cameo types; $14 (for Proof 60) to $350 (for PF69) for Cameo Kennedy halves; and $100 (for PF66) to $3,000 (for PF69) for deep cameo variety.
SMS$156,000 (graded SP68)

1964 Kennedy Half Dollar Error

The 1964 Kennedy half-dollar errors can be similar in appearance to normal, circulated coins, which makes them difficult to identify. Grading companies do not have much grading data for Kennedy half errors lower than About Uncirculated grade.

Below are some of the most common Kennedy half dollar errors to look for and their respective values:

1964 D Kennedy Half Dollar Doubled Die DDO 001

Double Die Obverse FS-104

The 1964 Kennedy double die obverse with an FS-104 grading and in mint state (MS) 63 is valued at $225, according to the PGCS. First strike (F.S.) coins are coins that coin grading services receive within thirty days of the coin’s release date.

Double Die FS-502

The Double Die FS-502 features a visible error on the mint mark D, which was re-punched north of the original mint mark. This variety also has visible traces of two extra impressions right below the two visible ones to the south.

Quadruple die obverse

The 1964-D quadrupled die obverse Kennedy half dollar is one of the most important error coins of the 1964 Kennedy halves. The quadrupling is visible on the U of the TRUST (IN GOD WE TRUST) and the right side of the number 4 on the coin’s year of issue. This error variety is known as FS-105.

Double die obverse FS-106

The doubling on the double die obverse FS-106 variety is seen on the lettering IN GOD WE TRUST. In MS63 grade, this error coin is worth $85.

Double Die (D/D)

The 1964-D double die mint error coins are graded as one of the greatest U.S. modern coins. The die error is visible on the mint mark D, which was re-punched north of the original mint mark. Known grades for this error coin are XF45 and MS63, valued at $19 and $80, respectively.

Double Die Obverse (DD0)

The 1964-D double die obverse Kennedy half dollar is a scarce error, and the PCGS has only identified a few examples. The doubling of the words “In God, We Trust” is visible with the naked eye, and the highest grade of this error coin is an MS65 valued at $60.

Triple Die Obverse

The 1964 Kennedy half triple die obverse variety features a very strong tripling of the words IN GOD WE TRUST and the year of issue, 1964. This coin is rare and most available in Extra Fine 45 (XF45) grading and MS63, valued at $18 and $55, respectively.

Factors That Affect the Value of a 1964 Kennedy Half Dollar

Grade

The grade or condition of a 1964 Kennedy Half Dollar is a crucial factor in determining its value. The coin’s grade is determined by its wear and tear, with uncirculated coins being the most valuable. The most commonly used grading scale for coins is the Sheldon grading scale, which ranges from 1 to 70. A coin with a grade of 1 is in the poorest condition, while a coin with a grade of 70 is considered perfect or flawless. A higher grade will typically result in a higher value for the coin.

Rarity

The rarity of a 1964 Kennedy Half Dollar is another important factor that can affect its value. Rarity is determined by the number of coins produced and the number of coins that are still in existence. Some 1964 Kennedy Half Dollars are rare than others due to minting errors, such as double dies or overdates, or due to low production numbers. Coins with lower mintage numbers or rare errors can fetch a higher value than more common coins.

Other factors that can affect the value of a 1964 Kennedy Half Dollar include its mint mark, its variety, and its overall appearance. Coins with a strong strike, good eye appeal, and attractive toning can also fetch a higher value. It’s important to keep in mind that coin values can fluctuate over time, so it’s essential to stay up to date on market trends and seek the advice of a professional coin dealer or appraiser. And when you are ready, you might want to sell coins collection and enjoy the monetary benefits of your findings.

How to Determine the Value of a 1964 Kennedy Half Dollar

Determining the value of a 1964 Kennedy Half Dollar coin involves several important steps. By following these steps, you can determine the coin’s worth more accurately.

Step 1: Identify the Date and Mintmark Combination

The first step in determining the value of a 1964 Kennedy Half Dollar is to identify the date and mintmark combination. The 1964 Kennedy Half Dollar is a very common coin, but the value can vary depending on the mintmark. The mintmark can be found on the obverse of the coin and is located just above the date. The 1964 Kennedy Half Dollar was minted at three different locations: Philadelphia (no mintmark), and Denver (D).

Step 2: Judge the Condition to Identify the Grade

The second step is to judge the coin’s condition to identify its grade. Grading a coin involves examining the surface of the coin, checking for wear and tear, and assessing any other flaws or damage. The grade of a coin can have a significant impact on its value. Coins are graded on a scale from Poor 1 (P1) to Perfect Mint State 70 (MS70). The higher the grade, the more valuable the coin.

Step 3: Look for Special Qualities Enhancing Value

The third step is to look for any special qualities or characteristics that could enhance the coin’s value. These can include errors such as double die errors, or other unique features

FAQ

How do I know if my 1964 Kennedy half dollar is valuable?

The value of a 1964 Kennedy half dollar depends on several factors, including the coin’s condition, mintmark, and any errors or special qualities. If you’re unsure of the value of your coin, it’s best to have it evaluated by a professional coin appraiser or to check current market values online.

What makes a 1964 Kennedy half dollar rare?

While millions of 1964 Kennedy half dollars were minted, certain factors can make them rare and valuable. For example, coins with certain mintmarks, errors, or high grades can be considered rare and worth more than their common counterparts. Additionally, coins with historical or cultural significance may also be considered rare and valuable.

Is a 1964 half dollar real silver?

Yes, the 1964 Kennedy half dollar is made of 90% silver and 10% copper. In fact, it’s one of the last circulating U.S. coins to contain a significant amount of silver.

What is the error on a 1964 JFK half-dollar?

There are several errors and varieties associated with 1964 Kennedy half dollars, including double dies, triple dies, and quadruple dies. One of the most famous errors is the 1964-D double die obverse, which features doubling on the letters in the words “In God We Trust” and other parts of the design.

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